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LEADER 00000cam  2200000   4500 
001    ocm00494973 
003    OCoLC 
005    20080625000000.0 
008    721026s1972    njua     b    001 0 eng   
010       70173755 
015    GB95-78361 
016 7  0341700|2DNLM 
019    28936201|a35136637 
020    0691081042 
020    9780691081045 
020    0691023670|qpaperback 
020    9780691023670|qpaperback 
035    (OCoLC)00494973 
035    (OCoLC)494973|z(OCoLC)28936201|z(OCoLC)35136637 
040    DLC|beng|cDLC|dUBA|dMUQ|dUKM|dRCE|dIJC|dNLGGC|dBTCTA|dNLM
       |dOCLCQ|dMIH 
049    GWKA 
050 00 TK7885.A5|bG64 
060 00 Z 699|bG624c 1972 
082 00 621.3819/5/09 
084    54.01|2bcl 
100 1  Goldstine, Herman H.|q(Herman Heine),|d1913-2004. 
245 14 The computer from Pascal to von Neumann /|c[by] Herman H. 
       Goldstine. 
264  1 [Princeton, N.J.] :|bPrinceton University Press|c[1972] 
300    x, 378 pages :|billustrations ;|c25 cm 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    unmediated|bn|2rdamedia 
338    volume|bnc|2rdacarrier 
504    Includes bibliographical references. 
505 0  Preface -- Part One: The historical background up to World
       War II -- Beginnings -- Charles Babbage and his analytical
       engine -- The astronomical ephemeris -- The Universities: 
       Maxwell and Boole -- Integrators and planimeters -- 
       Michelson, Fourier Coefficients, and the Gibbs Phenomenon 
       -- Boolean Algebra: x2=xx=x -- Billings, Hollerith, and 
       the Census -- Ballistics and the rise of the great 
       mathematicians -- Bush's differential analyzer and other 
       analog devices -- Adaptation to scientific needs -- 
       Renascence and triumph of digital means of computation -- 
       Part Two: Wartime developments: ENIAC and EDVAC -- 
       Electronic efforts prior to the ENIAC -- The ballistic 
       research laboratory -- Differences between analog and 
       digital machines -- Beginnings of the ENIAC -- The ENIAC 
       as a mathematical instrument -- John von Neumann and the 
       computer -- Beyond the ENIAC -- The structure of the EDVAC
       -- The spread of ideas -- First Calculations on the ENIAC 
       -- Part Three: Post-World War II: The von Neumann Machine 
       and the institute for advanced study -- Post-EDVAC days --
       The institute for advanced study computer -- Automata 
       theory and logic machines -- Numerical Mathematics -- 
       Numerical Meteorology -- Engineering activities and 
       achievements -- The computer and UNESCO -- The Early 
       Industrial Scene -- Programming languages -- Conclusions -
       - Appendix: World-Wide Developments -- Index 
650  0 Computers|xHistory. 
650  2 Computer-Assisted Instruction|xhistory. 
653 00 Computers|aHistory 
856 42 |3Publisher description|uhttp://www.loc.gov/catdir/
       description/prin051/70173755.html 
938    Baker and Taylor|bBTCP|n70173755 
994    90|bGWK 
Location Call No. Status
 New Britain, Main Library - Non Fiction  621.3819 G57    Check Shelf